20 Social Media Tools: Automation to Save Time and Outperform Competitors

Use social media tools to automate some of your tasks. 

Not only will you be able to do everything and then some, but you’ll also be able to have an even bigger impact on social media than you are having right now, and do it in less time. 

There’s always so much to do in a day as a social media manager. 

You’ve got to create social media posts, design graphics, post content across ALL of your platforms, see who liked your previous content, respond to the angry client on Facebook, find out who is talking about you and update your boss on how everything is working out. 

Don’t you wish you had a few extra hours in your day?

Your stress levels are rising. Something needs to get pushed back but everything seems important.

Automation allows you to write and design your content in advance and schedule it to share at a later date.

By automating some social media tasks, you’ll be able to complete and schedule your work at one go and eliminate the tedious, manual busywork.

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Benefits of Automation

Quick Tips on How to Use Social Media Automation

What Metrics To Automate

20 Social Media Tools for Automation

Social Media Scheduling Tools
1. Buffer
2. Hootsuite
3. Tailwind
4. CoSchedule
5. MeetEdgar

Social Media Analytics Tools:
6. Twitter Analytics
7. Facebook Analytics
8. Keyhole

Content Creation and Curation Tools:
9. BuzzSumo
10. Scoop.it
11. Pocket

Social Media Monitoring Tools:
12. Sprout Social
13. AgoraPulse
14. Google Alerts
15. Falcon.io

Social Media Tracking Tools:
16. SocialFlow
17. Socialert
18. Brand24
19. Mention
20. Meltwater

Benefits of Automation

Forget the naysayers who claim that your automated content will be penalized. According to a study by Buffer, posts from third-party tools do not receive less engagement than natively posted posts.

It’s also not true that automated social media marketing is impersonal because it takes a personal touch to write your messages and design the visuals you’ll share. 

That said, there are plenty of benefits to social media automation, including:

  • More control over your accounts
    • Social media tools give you better control of your social media accounts. You are able to control the kind of content to be shared, when and how often. You are also able to post more content on multiple platforms with more ease. 
  • Saves you time
    • The biggest benefit of automation is that it saves you A LOT of time. Instead of spending hours on end curating content and posting it manually on individual platforms. Automation tools enable you to share content to multiple platforms at the same time from one dashboard. 

Quick Tips on How to Use Social Media Automation

Once you start implementing social media automation and the use of social media tools, keep a flexible schedule.

Leave room for timely updates that cannot be scheduled ahead of time. Automation does not mean that you should never do ad-hoc posts. 

Another important tip to keep in mind is timing.

While you’re free to schedule your posts to go out anytime you want, consider the time your audience is most active on each platform. This will ensure that your content gets optimal engagement. 

Once you have an automation system going, monitor and then evaluate it.

Use analytics to see how your content performed since you started automating it. This way, you’ll know how to tweak your automation process.  

Lastly, not everything should be automated. It’s still important to have meaningful conversations with your users and this cannot be achieved via automation. Such conversations have to be done in real-time. 

What Metrics to Automate

As mentioned, not everything should be automated. So what should you automate?

1. Content Curation and Creation

Sharing relatable third-party content is part of a successful social media strategy. However, finding the right content can take up all your time. 

Automating your content curation process will make it easy to find current content and post it consistently. 

2. Non-Urgent Social Media Posts

Not every content that you have needs to be posted immediately. Think about your evergreen blog posts, quotes, retweets, and third-party content. These can be shared at any time. So feel free to schedule them.

3. Your RSS feeds

Automate your RSS feed to keep sharing your new blog content as soon as it is posted. However, remember to keep an eye on comments and reply to them in person. 

In addition, DO NOT automate other people’s RSS feeds as you might end up sharing content that is irrelevant to your brand or promote other people’s products. 

4. Social Media Leads

You don’t need to manually collect every lead you get from your social media marketing efforts. You can automate this process and save yourself some time that you can use to follow up with the leads collected. 

5. Analytics

To know the value of the effort spent on social media marketing you need reports showing how your platforms performed over a given period of time.

Trying to generate these reports manually can be an uphill task. Instead, use a social media reporting tool to do it.

6. Social Listening

It’s important to know who is talking about your brand online and what they are saying. It’s near impossible to manually find every mention of your brand. There are tools, however, that are specially designed to do this. 

20 Social Media Tools for Automation

Successful automation depends on using the best tools available. There are thousands of automation tools available but not every one of them will be best for you.

To guide you on what tools to use, let’s take a look at the best tools for each of the social media tasks that you should be automating. 

Social Media Scheduling Tools

1. Buffer

Buffer is a popular social media scheduling tool. 

It allows you to schedule your posts across Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Pinterest. 

You can have a preset schedule and your posts will be added to it automatically when you create them on Buffer. 

2. Hootsuite

Hootsuite is another powerful yet simple to use, content scheduling tool. 

Hootsuite is best for scheduling posts in advance on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. 

The tool has an added analytics tool that enables you to measure content engagement, so you understand how your content is performing.

3. Tailwind 

Creating Instagram and Pinterest posts on the go can be quite consuming. Tailwind is by far one of the best tools to use for your Instagram and Pinterest posts. 

You can use it to pin multiple boards on Pinterest at once, bulk upload, and schedule posts. 

Its drag-and-drop calendar makes scheduling content very easy.

4. CoSchedule

CoSchedule makes social media scheduling on different social media platforms easy allowing you to manage multiple accounts stress-free. 

You can schedule over 60 posts at once on CoSchedule. You can also use it to directly answer queries from its interface.

5. MeetEdgar

MeetEdgar allows you to build a library of content that you can share across different platforms. The tool then automatically schedules it for you—including repeat posts. 

Better still, it will write variations of your posts to keep things fresh.

Social Media Analytics Tools

6. Twitter Analytics

You have access to Twitter Analytics as long as you have a Twitter profile. 

This free tool allows you to measure the performance of your Twitter marketing campaign

It will show you how many likes, comments, and retweets your tweets get. This way, you are able to see how people interact with your content and adjust your campaign accordingly.

7. Facebook Analytics

Facebook Analytics comes with your Facebook account. It’s a simple free tool that allows you to see how people are interacting with your Facebook content. 

It also goes further to show you who these people interacting with your content are and where they are. This enables you to create content that is targeted and most relevant to your top fans. 

8. Keyhole

Keyhole allows you to monitor hashtag campaigns, keyword tracking, account tracking, and mentions.

You can view your brand or campaign’s performance on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube in an in-depth visual representation. 

In addition to monitoring your social media performance, you can also monitor sentiments around your brand. You also get to monitor your competition and compare your brand accounts and campaigns against major competitors.

Content Creation and Curation Tools

9. Buzzsumo

Want to find out what is currently trending? Use Buzzsumo

Buzzsumo makes it easy to search for viral and trendy topics related to your industry. Simply use a relevant keyword to automate your research. 

You can filter the results on the basis of location, industry, platform, etc.

Buzzsumo is also a great tool to find social media influencers

10. Scoop.it

Use Scoop.it to curate content from other sources and then add your opinion and share it on your platforms with the push of a button. 

It has a smart content calendar that you can use to publish your own posts as well as the content you curate.

11. Pocket

Think of Pocket as Pinterest for content. 

It is a free Chrome extension that allows you to save any content you come across on the web. 

You have access to the content you save in your Pocket account anytime and anywhere, at your convenience. You can even access it on your phone through its iOS or Android app.

Social Media Monitoring Tools

12. Sprout Social

Sprout Social is an all-in-one social media marketing tool that makes it easy to coordinate and delegate tasks to team members.

In addition to helping you curate and create content, you can use it to schedule, analyze and monitor your content. 

13. AgoraPulse

AgoraPulse has both basic scheduling and analytics features to help you schedule posts and create reports. 

It also allows you to run contests, quizzes, and promotions and measure how they performed. 

In addition, you can see how your social media marketing campaign measures up against your competitors.

14. Google Alerts

Google Alerts is a really good basic monitoring solution.

The tool scans through the web and sends you alerts whenever your brand or product gets mentioned. 

You can choose which sources you want to be alerted on such as blogs, news sites or forums.

15. Falcon.io

Falcon.io is another great social listening, customer engagement, content marketing and audience management tool.

It supports all the major social media such as Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter. Using it will help you stay on top of your trends. 

You can use this tool to monitor influencers and directly engage with them. 

Social Media Tracking Tools

16. SocialFlow

Want to monitor your brand as the bigwigs do? Use SocialFlow

SocialFlow is a favourite of big brands like The Washington Post, Mashable, and National Geographic.

This tool tracks conversations in real-time and gathers insight on your behalf. With these insights, you’re able to tell the content that works and the best time to share it. 

17. Socialert

Socialert makes social media listening effortless and comes with tons of added features.

Use this tool to track hashtags and keywords on a real-time basis. It will alert you whenever a particular keyword is mentioned. 

This way, you’re able to collect user-generated content, perform brand monitoring, find industry-related influencers, and so much more.

18. Brand24

Brand24 shows you all the instances your brand has been mentioned anywhere on the internet.

You also get to see the mentions from your niche and competitors helping to know how you stack up against your competition.

The tool can also help you identify and reach out to influencers within your industry so that you can strike a good relationship with them and help your business gain more visibility. 

You can also use Brand24 to track hot or relevant discussions, topics, and trends so you can have fresh content ideas. 

19. Mention

Mention ensures that you never miss a conversation on social media. 

The tool lists all your brand mentions instantly on your dashboard. This gives you a good opportunity to conduct brand monitoring, competitor analysis, and so on. 

A good added feature is the ability to use it to get in touch with your customers and resolve their queries on the go.

20. Meltwater

Meltwater allows you to track brand mentions, monitor campaigns and keep abreast of critical conversations about your brand on social media.

This tool helps you listen to relevant social media conversations. With this kind of information, you can then make intelligent marketing decisions. 

Additionally, you can also use Meltwater to schedule posts to publish later.

Are you ready to automate?

Social media automation is an important social media marketing process that is sure to save you time in 2020.

But it’s not merely a set and forget strategy.

You still need to make time to regularly visit your social media accounts and engage with your audience– this is what it means to be truly social.

Let these social media tools do repetitive work for you and free up your time for more meaningful social interactions!


Keyhole is a real-time conversation tracker that provides keyword and hashtag analytics for Twitter and Instagram. Get started for free.

16 Social Listening Strategies to Incorporate Into Your Business Strategy [+2 tools!]

16 Ways to Incorporate Social Listening Into Your Business Strategy - Banner

Updated on February 11th, 2020.

With 3.03 billion active social media users around the world, you can use social listening to tune in and monitor what your customers are saying about your business across a variety of platforms. 

This allows you to listen to your customer base, learn more about them and interact with them. 

You can also identify possible new customers, and learn more about your industry or competitors. 

Social listening needs to be actionable. To use it to your advantage, you need to make the most out of conversations that happen about your brand and industry. 

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16 Social Listening Strategies:
1. Develop Leads by Pinpointing Prospects
2. Develop Leads through Dissatisfied Competitor Customers
3. Learn Your Audience’s Language
4. Identify Influencers
5. Find Feedback
6. Start Conversations with Users Who Don’t Tag You
7. Keep Tabs on Industry News and Developing Trends
8. Track and Measure the Results of Social Campaigns
9. Discover New Audience Spaces
10. Answer Indirect Questions
11. Monitor Competitor Content
12. Create Customer and Prospect Personas
13. Research and Develop
14. Detect and Mitigate Issues Before they Escalate
15. Send Bottom-of-the-Funnel Customers to Gated Free Trials, Product Pages, or Waiting Lists
16. Refer Top-of-the-Funnel Customers to Ungated Content

2 Social Listening Tools to Grow Your Business

Here are 16 social listening strategies you can incorporate to grow your business and 2 tools to execute your strategy:

1. Develop Leads by Pinpointing Prospects

By tracking a range of terms, you can reveal users in your target market who may not know about your business.

To locate potential customers, track keywords and hashtags related to your niche that reflect:

  • Trade publications
  • Common practices
  • Issues in your sector
  • Leading figures and products

It can take between seconds and days to find posts containing your terms, depending on the social scale of your business and industry. Regardless, consider users who post with those terms as prospects.

The next step involves putting your social media sales hat on. Join the conversation by replying to them.

For example, give your opinion about a trend or send the prospect to a relevant page on your website.

This can earn you a fan and generate interest in your brand. The user may engage with you in the future or explore your website and eventually convert.

2. Develop Leads through Dissatisfied Competitor Customers

With similar tactics, you can find users eager to try new products and services.

Instagram Unhappy - 15 Ways to Grow Your Business Through Social Listening and a List of 3 Tools

Track your competitors’ usernames, brand hashtags and product names to locate prospects who may be tired of their services.

Along with these terms, monitor negative keywords such as:

  • Not
  • Can’t
  • Won’t
  • Doesn’t

Depending on your social media monitoring tool, this can be done by typing the following into the search function:

“competitor name” AND “negative keyword”

As you identify unhappy customers, ask them what they’re looking for in an ideal product. If you can meet their needs, link them to a demo, discount or free trial.

But remember, they’re upset. Use gentle language and don’t force a reply from them.

3. Learn Your Audience’s Language

Effectively marketing a product through content such as ads and landing pages involves speaking the audience’s language.

This is largely because it shows you understand their common train of thought. As a result, you can better communicate with them.

As you study posts that use your tracked keywords, you may notice that members of your market:

  • Phrase concepts in a specific way
  • Use common secondary keywords
  • Write simple, complex or somewhere-in-between sentences

Without compromising clarity, implement the findings in your content.

Unconvinced it’ll make a difference? Run a landing page A/B test using your writing style versus an adjusted style that uses your audience’s diction.

Go forward based on the winning conversion rate.

READ: The Marketer’s Guide to Writing Click-Worthy Headlines

4. Identify Influencers

As brands turn to popular online personalities to post about their products, social listening is becoming a viable way to identify influencers.

To find social media thought leaders in your niche, track the URLs and titles of:

  • Popular blog posts
  • Authoritative case studies
  • Content from industry-leading blogs and publications

You then need to determine who’s earning the highest engagement rate when sharing this material.

Use this simple formula to calculate engagement rate:

engagement rate formula

After you identify influencers, reach out to them by pitching your campaign idea. Explain how they’ll benefit and then ask for their participation.

5. Find Feedback

Tracking your brand and product names can uncover customer feedback across niche and popular social platforms.

Combined with positive and negative terms, such as “does” and “doesn’t,” you can locate reviews, complaints and endorsements.

As customers post positive comments, ask to use them as testimonials on your website, and make an effort to repost or retweet positive feedback.

This is a great strategy because it reminds your followers of the awesomeness of what you’re selling, and will likely interest new leads who happen to hear others raving about you.

Money saving app Piggybank does a great job at this. They repost the positive reviews they get from Twitter right on their Instagram page.

Image of Sam Hart tweeting about 'Saving Violently' using Piggybank

Since consumers resonate more easily with reviews from fellow consumers than from ads sent out by brands, Piggybank’s happy customers see fit to testify to the customer review Piggybank posted…

Image of Sam Hart tweeting about 'Saving Violently' using Piggybank

And there are also bottom-of-the-funnel customers asking how to get started; here’s one:

Image of Piggybank linking signup

On the flip side, you can also find negative feedback or comments through social listening.

But what you do after getting bad reviews is what matters the most.

It can be overwhelming to take note of every single piece of negative feedback, but the trick is to find the public embarrassments your company can do something about and handle the situation with finesse and style that impresses onlookers.

For example, JetBlue got a tweet from a customer who was complaining about being on a flight that had a bad headphone jack and a malfunctioning TV.

Image of cutomer tweeting to JetBlue

JetBlue responded with what clearly looks like more than just an apology; they offered to compensate the customer with a $15 credit for the inconvenience (once she can confirm she’s the actual customer who had the experience).

6. Start Conversations with Users Who Don’t Tag You

If you only pay attention to your direct mentions on platforms such as Twitter and Instagram, you can miss chances to connect with prospects and nurture leads.

As well as not tagging you, it’s common for users to:

  • Misspell your name when trying to tag you
  • Talk about your products or services without mentioning your business
  • Misspell those products and services, too

The solution is to monitor the names of your business, products and services, along with their common incorrect spellings.

For the latter, type the names into your phone. Note any autocorrects and create social listening trackers with your tool of choice. You can also think up misspellings on your own.

7. Keep Tabs on Industry News and Developing Trends

Monitoring the social web for news and trends can provide topics to post and blog about, keeping your content marketing strategy fresh.

To stay on top of what’s relevant, track keywords and usernames for big players and authoritative publications in your sector.

A tool like Keyhole can help you track other accounts, hashtags, or keywords.

Along with these keywords, monitor standard news terms such as:

  • Breaking
  • Developing
  • Trending

Depending on your social listening software, you can do this by typing a news term and publication name into the search function:

“breaking” AND “Wall Street Journal”

As you collect data about news and trends, your business can demonstrate expertise by creating and promoting articles that explain a story’s background issues.

READ: How to Build, Run and Grow a Successful Company Blog [Douglas Karr Interview]

8. Track and Measure the Results of Social Campaigns

This may seem like a moot point to some, but many marketers don’t track social media campaigns run by rivals, role models or even their own brands.

Since many social listening tools have analytics suites, you can collect data surrounding hashtag campaigns on Twitter, Instagram and other platforms.

Beyond tracking performance, this data is useful for:

  • Setting goals for future campaigns
  • Analyzing which demographics within your target audience were most active, tailoring upcoming ads and content toward them

Another simple way to collect valuable data is to share your content using custom short URLs in place of generic short links.

By doing this, you’ll be able to collect click data at its source, giving you the ability to analyze your content’s performance, easily identify which types of content your audience engages with most and set a strong social media strategy going forward.

9. Discover New Audience Spaces

A multi-channel social listening strategy can reveal audience activity on platforms you didn’t know about.

You may uncover conversations surrounding trends, competitors and even your business by searching through different forums, communities and social sites.

For example, people thinking about cosmetic surgery may not take to Twitter to express their concerns. Instead, niche forums are more common:

Cosmetic Surgery - 15 Ways to Grow Your Business Through Social Listening and a List of 3 Media Monitoring Tools

As you discover platforms that audience members frequent, read their posts to gain more insights about their needs, desires and pain-points.

READ: 10 Mistakes that Keep Your Key Social Metrics from Growing

10. Answer Indirect Questions

Answering questions isn’t always a way to overtly promote your business. Rather, it introduces you to prospects and helps build rapport.

You’ll inevitably stumble upon queries as you track brand and industry keywords.

For example, if you make task managers, you’ll likely find questions about prioritization and project management. You can respond by giving an answer or link to a relevant blog post.

Task Manager - 15 Ways to Grow Your Business with Social Media Monitoring and 3 Tools List

It’s less common for people to ask for task manager recommendations. But when that time comes, feel free to make the case for your product.

11. Monitor Competitor Content

Monitoring how a competitor’s content performs on social media can help you develop blog ideas and tactics.

Since you likely share an audience with opposing businesses, content that works well for them can work well for you.

Start by tracking a content piece’s URL and title. Depending on your tool, this should generate engagement data – how many times it’s been shared and by whom. You may also see opinions and conversations about the piece.

Use these insights by:

  • Seeing which issues and pain points resonate with your audience
  • Modeling posts, studies and infographics off popular content
  • Reaching out to users when sharing your similar material you’ve made

Keyhole allows you to monitor competitor content such as their accounts and hashtags.

12. Create Customer and Prospect Personas

Analyzing the profiles of users who post with your monitored terms is a way to build buyer personas – representations of customer groups to help you understand your target markets.

First, make a spreadsheet and fill it with the profile URLs of people who use your brand-specific keywords and hashtags. Second, once you’re comfortable with the size your list, look at each profile for information about:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Position
  • Industry
  • Business size and scope
Buyer Persona - 15 Ways to Grow Your Business Through Social Listening and a List of 3 Tools

Third, sort the profiles into groups based on this data. You may be surprised to learn which kinds of people make up your social audience.

Understanding who you’re communicating with should boost clicks and engagements as you craft messages and campaigns.

13. Research and Develop

You can think up ideas worth investigating by sifting through social listening reports, such as:

  • Creating new services or products
  • Launching events or campaigns your audience would likely enjoy
  • Altering brand positioning based on what consumers say about your and the competition

Depending on your organization’s structure, putting these ideas into action could involve collaborating with a different department or the team member beside you.

Regardless, uncovering them starts by tracking broad industry terms.

For example, if you’re a marketer for an analytics brand, you might monitor “metrics” and “social data.” You’ll eventually see someone express a need or desire. Reach out if you can already solve their pain point.

If not, consider taking the necessary steps to do so.

14. Detect and Mitigate Issues Before they Escalate

DKNY Crisis - 15 Ways to Grow Your Business Through Social Media Monitoring and List of 3 Tools
With its social listening strategy, DKNY reacted to this Facebook crisis within four hours.

Monitoring brand and industry keywords can inform you when concerns and problems develop, helping you quickly react.

Let’s say you’re in the software business. One day, you notice someone tweeting about a significant error.

You would immediately try to replicate that error, and:

  • If you can replicate it, try to fix it. Then, reach out to the user to explain it’s on the mend.
  • If you can’t replicate it, show your concern. Tweet with the user and ask for more information.

What’s the value of a speedy reaction?

Consumers expect you to swiftly address problems in the age of social media. To see why, read about Domino’s Pizza employees filming themselves ruining ingredients.

A slow, or non-existent, reaction can push customers away and damage your reputation.

15. Send Bottom-of-the-Funnel Customers to Gated Free Trials, Product Pages, or Waiting Lists

Bottom-of-the-funnel consumers are also always lurking around conversations about your industry, brand, or specific product.

These people have heard about your brand before.

And they’re ready to buy. They just need a few questions answered.

So they ask questions like “Is there a version that will include xyz feature coming soon?” OR “Can your product do this specific thing?” If you’re keeping tabs on conversations in your industry, you’ll be able to pull these prospects into the fold.

In 2017, Audi had a tweet where a prospective buyer (Godwin) asked if they had any new upgrades on a couple of their cars.

Audi responded saying the feature is coming in 2018, and sent the buyer a link where he could sign up with them to get updated once it’s out.

Image of Audi's tweet to the buyer

Once the buyer clicks the link, Audi sends him to a well-designed landing page where he’s being welcomed as a lead. The car brand gets his info and gets the chance to alert him once his desired feature is out in the market.

This means while Audi is responding to Godwin with a signup form to fill, there are probably other potential buyers around who have the same question Godwin asked and would sign up to get updates from Audi as well — via the same page Audi sent to Godwin.

This way, Audi is using social listening as a tactic to generate more leads for their new car upgrade coming in 2018.

It’s a powerful social listening strategy to monitor these industry interactions and earn the opportunity to convert bottom-of-the-funnel prospects into actual paying buyers.

And if, like Audi, you don’t already have the feature or exact product a potential buyer is asking for, have a well-designed page ready to convert the person into a lead — so you have the opportunity to draw them back to your business when it’s time.

16. Refer Top-of-the-Funnel Customers to Ungated Content

Top-of-the-funnel customers are also lurking around.

There’s always someone hearing about your brand or product for the first time, or seeing conversations about your brand or industry.

Unlike those on the bottom-of-the funnel, these people aren’t ready to buy anything.

They only want to learn more about the matter being discussed — your product, brand or industry.

You can refer these customers to a piece of content, a handy tool, or any value that answers their questions and get them ready to buy.

Audi, in the example above, sent ready-to-buy prospects right from social interactions to a gated page; should you do the same for top-of-the-funnel customers? Not quite.

Picture this for a moment: you go to Twitter and find a promoted tweet that interests you. The tweet is from a brand you’ve never seen or heard of before, promoting a product you don’t entirely understand.

So you’re curious. You want to learn more about about what’s being promoted. You reply the tweet asking “How do I get started?”

To which the brand replies, “Go to [this url] to learn how to get started.”

Would you click or not? You probably would. After all, you’re the one looking for answers.

But upon arrival on the page, you find a form asking for your personal information.

Would you give your information just to learn more about a product? You probably won’t. Especially when you’re just trying to see how to get started with a product.

If you were ready to get started, that’s a different case, you’d sign up. But gating a page that’ll teach you how to get started? Not ideal.

So it’s best to make your tool, content or any other value ungated for people who just want to “learn more”.

2 Social Listening Tools to Grow Your Business

A great social monitoring tool will analyze the most engaging posts about your brand, alert you when influencers talk about you or identify possible influencers, as well as indicate when a keyword or topic you’re tracking is being buzzed about on social platforms.

Here are 2 social listening tools that do all of the above.

1. Keyhole

Keyhole monitors real-time and historical data around URLs, hashtags, keywords and usernames on Twitter and Instagram.

A screenshot of Keyhole's social listening tracker.

By inputting up to five terms in this social listening tool’s search function, it will generate and track metrics such as:

  • The number of posts and people using your terms
  • User demographic information, including gender and location
  • Top posts, based on engagement data such as shares and replies
  • Influence data, such as which users are drawing the most attention to your tracked terms

In a shareable and printable dashboard, it displays this data in tables, timelines, pie charts and bar graphs.

Price: Starts at $179 USD; advanced plans vary

READ: Forbes Uses Keyhole to Track and Rank SXSW Hashtags

2. Talkwalker

Talkwalker tracks real-time and historical data surrounding keywords, taking data from almost all major social platforms. It also monitors blogs, forums and online news websites for keyword mentions.

For Twitter and Facebook, it provides analytics such as:

  • Engagement rate
  • Activity levels, including the times when users post with a given keyword
  • Share of voice, which is a calculation of how much a user or brand is contributing to online conversations about your keyword

You can use Talkwalker as a traditional media monitoring tool, too. It tracks keywords on global TV, radio and newswires.

Price: Starts at $800 USD per month; advanced plans vary


Whether people are having conversations directly about your brand, your industry, or your competitors, there’s a constant information exchange at high volumes.  

Social listening can contribute greatly to your business’s growth in a variety of different ways. 

You need to keep listening and monitoring to inform your social media and business strategies.

Keyhole is a real-time conversation tracker that provides keyword and hashtag analytics for Twitter and Instagram. Get started for free.

Miss Topsy? Here are the Top 3 Topsy Alternatives

It’s no longer news; Topsy is dead.

Back in 2015, Apple shut the tool down after purchasing it for $200 million two years before. Hardly anyone saw the end of Topsy coming, but well, it happened. 

So what now? Of course, you can’t abandon your social media marketing job because Topsy is no more.

You need a Topsy alternative that can perform the same function it did – or go beyond it.

And you’re at just the right place to find that; here are the top three Topsy alternatives you can use:

Read moreMiss Topsy? Here are the Top 3 Topsy Alternatives

15 Ways to Grow Your Business through Social Listening [+ 3 Tools!]

If social listening isn’t clearly benefiting your business, it could mean your approach has holes.

By monitoring URLs, keywords and hashtags – either manually or with a tracking tool – you can collect information about prospects, competitors and your industry at large to inform sales and marketing efforts. You’ll also open opportunities to directly interact with audience members.

Read more15 Ways to Grow Your Business through Social Listening [+ 3 Tools!]

Life is short and the internet is vast.